Art Gallery

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Review of Frank J. Miller's work


This new body of work continues to reflect Miller's high standards of meticulous craftsmanship as well as holding some surprises for his audience. A recent visit to the Louise Nevelson retrospective has inspired a departure from his well-known bas-relief wall pieces into free standing three dimensional work.

photo of a Piece of a piece of art

This new work continues to reflect the artist's fascination with the industrial detritus of our culture. Miller finds the unseen beauty in everything from abandoned factory sites to the minute interior mechanisms of discarded appliances. His rich palette of earth tones and carefully calibrated surface textures mirrors the ambient patina of rust and decay that he resurrects into works of great harmony and beauty. Miller's continued exploration of the dialogue between interior and exterior space propels the viewer into the contemplation of the past, the present and the future. Exploring a broad spectrum of art's history, Frank Miller speaks of his early epiphany with the work of Rembrandt as well as his awe of the work of Richard Serra while mastering his own voice with art that speaks to our contemporary world.

Process

photo of a Piece of a piece of art

Each piece is constructed with ¼ inch birch plywood on a wooden frame. The scapes in each work are painted with artists' acrylic colors.

The objects glued to the surface are almost all plastic and some metal. These parts come from a variety of machinery, which includes VCRs, DVDs, radios, computer keyboards and anything else that has parts that are useful towards my objective.

Each electronic device and machine is disassembled. The parts I need are removed and the rest is saved for possible future projects. When necessary, which is most of the time, I use a table saw, band saw and grinder to shape the parts according to my needs. Each piece is then coated with an acrylic iron paint. When dry it is dipped in an oxidizing solution and rusted.

Frank Assembling a Piece for the Exhibit

After each piece is glued to the surface, it is then down-toned and or highlighted with artist acrylic colors to finish.